Curated Craigslist

Curated Cragislist: A Folk Art & Mid-Century Mix

Rattan, textiles, and folk pieces are a few of my favorite art forms, so I’m loving this particular Curated Craigslist. And as a fan of Mexican Otomi textiles in particular, I was obviously inspired to create a new collection when I found an Otomi upholstered Mid-Century chair. I threw in a few folk art pieces, like a ceramic llama and alebrije figurine for a bit of extra “cultura”, a Mid-Century sofa and set of side tables, and some extra woven pieces.

As I mentioned in my first CC post, this blog is truly about my love of vintage and things related, and with my Curated Craiglist series I hope to inspire anyone who reads this blog to go out and explore secondhand options for their home. Not only is it sustainable, but it’s super affordable!

Enjoy!

Links to Shop:

Mid-Century Sofa

Mid-Century Coffee Table

Folk Art Llama Figure

Wicker Chair

Mid-Century Otomi Upholstered Lounge Chair

Small Rug

Side Table Pair

Sinnerlig Pendant

Oaxacan Alebrije Figure

Mid-Century Martz Lamp

Art

The Psychedelic Desert, According to April Seelbach

One of the countless reasons I’m happy to be back home in Southern California is because of its proximity to one of my favorite natural landscapes–the desert!

I grew up exploring various deserts throughout the West with my parents. As I’ve mentioned in another post, my dad spent his youth in Saudi Arabia, dirt biking amongst the dunes and native bedouins surrounding the American oil towns there. So naturally, I spent a lot of time there as a kid. It was easiest to travel to Anza Borrego within San Diego county…and after all, SoCal is a desert. It feels like my natural habitat. So coming home to warm nights and unbearably hot days here in San Diego (that I actually can bear…I love hot weather) has been wonderful!

It’s interesting to see how the desert has become so romanticized over the years. Full disclosure, I’ve never been to Joshua Tree, but areas pretty close–but the idea of just going there has blown up (and honestly I’m pretty interested), and I’ve witnessed Instagram account after Instagram account filled with JT images or houses that people have taken up residence in. And to my friends who actually rock climb there, who scoff at the “glampers” and folks just in it for the trend, there’s a sense of ownership. The desert, whether it’s Joshua Tree or not, is a special place. It will always feel like that for me too.

So when I found April Seelbach’s account as I wandered down another rabbit hole (Instagram is a trip), it brought back that feeling. April layers digital patterns over her own photos of the desert from road trips she’s taken, and her work is decidedly retro. Her artwork reminds me of how the desert and nostalgia are somehow inherently connected (or maybe that’s just the romantic in me):

A psychedelic saguaro.

A self portrait.

Dusk? With some digital sun flare.

April also has a separate Instagram account filled with her beautiful, totally retro road trip photos here!

Thoughts on the desert?

Musings

Home In Sunny San Diego

Nearly two weeks ago, on a Wednesday morning after a few months to prep emotionally and pare my life down to what would fit in my Jeep and a sizable U-Haul, I left my beautiful home in the Bay with Max so we could both begin anew here in my hometown of San Diego. It was a bittersweet ending and I find myself still terribly homesick for San Francisco, and my friends and the wonderful people who came into my life there. It was a journey I’ll never forget, and something tells me Max and I may one day call the Bay home again.

So needless to say, it’s been a whirlwind coming here and getting adjusted, as I’ve frequently recounted to everyone who’s asked. On one hand I’m glad to be home…I’m close to family, in the sunshine again, finally moving in with Max, and with my friends here…but there is so much about my life in the Bay that I feel I’m missing, and that “reverse culture shock” I’m feeling still sits pretty heavily in my chest, and in lumps in my throat when I find myself alone, which is frequently at night while Max is off tying up loose ends back in the Bay Area. But I’ll continue to adjust and will hopefully find a balance once again between my work life, family life, relationship life, and writing. I love this blog, but it’s a lot to keep up. I will try my best to get a few new stories up that I have in mind. I’ll also be exploring the amazing world of vintage, thrifting, and antiquing that Southern California has to offer. It’s a new adventure for sure!

Tours

An Antique & Heirloom Filled Alameda Home

Nestled between a whimsical sunflower filled front yard and a home where it’s not unusual to find two curious pups peeking over the fence, is Katie and Carlos’ picketed early 20th century bungalow. Situated in the picturesque, Bay Area island suburb of Alameda, their place fits perfectly amidst a sea of other quaint homes and grand Victorians. Katie’s mentioning of her Mexican folk art and Frida Kahlo collections, and the fact that she lived in Alameda is what tipped me off that that her place might be adorable. And as soon as I walked through the patio, I knew I wouldn’t be disappointed!

For a town situated between the larger cities of Oakland and San Francisco, Alameda has some serious small town charm. Every 1st Sunday of the month I find myself driving through town to scavenge the Alameda Antique Faire, I’m hit with those “Pleasantville” warm and fuzzies (but in full color).

Katie’s street is lined with trees, as are most there, with a coffee shop, boutique, and selection of other businesses just down the way. Nearby, you’ll find Alameda’s downtown district, complete with a 1930s-built movie palace (if you’re lost, the giant vertical neon sign will guide you) and several restaurants and stores. I arrived in town a bit earlier than planned and she pointed me in the direction of the lagoon nearby and the best areas to ogle Victorians.

Katie, Carlos, and their old pup YumYum have rented this house for years, and have filled it with vintage and antiques, nostalgic pieces, and a few travel mementos. The charm begins in their front yard where, equipped with a bright neon green patio set, barbecue, and collection of potted succulents, the porch feels ready for summer and gives you a glimpse into the organized and collected style of the house.

Furnished with an eclectic mix of vintage pieces, including an antique chair and console as you enter, an old coffee table in perfect contrast to the floral rug beneath it, and several groupings of figurines and vases, Katie’s place is just how you’d imagine the home of a former art history major and auction house vet to appear.

The bust in the entryway is one of Katie’s favorite pieces. I had to share it, along with the scratched door moulding (YumYum’s doing. Sorry Katie!). I love the vignettes throughout the house, and how she’s even managed to make this YumYum themed corner look chic!

Katie and Carlos both have family keepsakes and old photos displayed throughout the house, like a steering wheel that belongs to Katie’s dad on the living room console. La Virgen de Guadalupe and Frida Kahlo make a few appearances in the form of candles and prints as well, alluding to Carlos’ Mexican heritage and Katie’s appreciation for Mexican art.

Part of this home’s charm, and one of my favorite aspects of it, is its architecture. Several cabinets in the kitchen open to reveal antiquated “technology” built into the walls, i.e. a fold-up ironing board (ok, this would technically work now), and a pantry originally used as a fridge with a separate shelf to place ice.

A framed Frida Kahlo looms over the kitchen, while bright oil cloth provides a canvas for colorful glass and kitchenware.

I’ve always been a sucker for clawfoot bath tubs, and to my delight, Katie’s bathroom is equipped with one!

The bedroom is just as cozy and collected as the rest of the house, with a small loveseat nestled perfectly in the corner and artwork all around.

Art

Mary Finlayson’s Painterly Still Life Artwork

This morning–a fortuitously sunny, 60-ish degree San Francisco-kind-of-warm morning–I made my way down to Fort Mason Center for one of my favorite events in the city: West Coast Craft! I’ve probably attended each event (there are a few every year here and in other cities) since I first caught a glimpse through the warehouse windows on a late night first date with my now boyfriend (hah!). As a forever crafter and lover of art, I’m always in awe of what people are creating, and today blew my mind! A handwoven rattan furniture company run out of a garage in Oakland/studio in Indonesia, hanging macrame lighting, Memphis inspired squiggled shirts and bags, and a slew of artists with funky, illustrative style were just a few of my personal highlights. And of all of these talented folks, I think I’ve found one of my new favorite artists.

The style of Painted Mary, aka Mary Finlayson, seems so clearly inspired by painterly, Fauvist paintings, and very closely resembles Hunt Slonem’s work. Seriously, you couldn’t tell the two apart! I love his work, and I’m so smitten with Mary’s paintings that I almost bought a print, but opted to wait until she stocked her store with new prints. I hope to fill my walls with a few of her deeply saturated still life depictions of potted flora and nudes. They are simply gorgeous!

 

 

 

 

For the Home

Get the Look: Marjorie Green’s Apartment from Twin Peaks 2017

If you’re a Twin Peaks fan, you may already have devoured the first few episodes of the series’ revival–and been in utter bewilderment.

Max and I started the original months ago, and we’re only a few episodes shy of finishing. So I figured I’d take a stab at this new revival, see what those old faces look like today, and find some continuity within the series as a whole. Not the case! Well, the continuity part anyways. I’ve long known who murdered Laura Palmer, but what’s with the glass box? Is Shaggy (aka Matthew Lilllard) the new killer? WHO designed frantic neighbor Marjorie’s adorable vintage apartment–the only thing that makes sense to me!?

On that note, after my confusion I was inspired to gather a few resources for getting the look of her MidMod pad, and I searched everywhere for a still shot of the place (and more info on what the heck I was watching). Enjoy!

 

Where to buy:

Floral Sofa

Vintage Side Table

Birdcage

Mid-Century Modern Lamp

Coffee Table

Rotary Phone

Lounge Chair

Floral Still Life Painting

Have you seen the new Twin Peaks?

Art

Thread Honey Embroidery: Feminism, The Stars, and a Bit of Pop Culture

Any form of textile construction has my heart. I flirted with the idea of staying in college longer so I could live out my passion and study textiles and fashion. I was in my last quarter and taking surface design and textile classes when I realized it was what I truly loved. I learned crochet, some sewing, and a form of textile art that really boggles me–embroidery.

It takes a special human to create embroidered artwork. After a few college projects trying to create the type of beautiful artwork I now find on Etsy and Instagram, my fingers were numb and my mind was in as many knots as the ones I had to untangle along the way. So embroidery artists, bless you and your patience!

Like I mentioned, I follow several folks on Instagram who have made this tedious craft their form of artistic expression (take Sarah K. Benning as an example), and I’m always stumbling upon others. Recently, I traveled down a blog rabbit hole and found designer and stylist Thread Honey’s whimsical (and sometimes cheeky) embroidered pieces. If you’re a feminist who loves astrology, pop culture, and impeccable knolling, check out her lovely work! You can also purchase patterns of some of the pieces I’m sure are her most popular.

Do you have a favorite embroidery artist?